Coronary Stent

Related Video: What is a Stent?

Overview

Definition

Coronary stenting is a way to open a blocked artery in the heart. During an angioplasty, a mesh, metal tube is placed in the artery. The tube is called a stent.

There are 2 types:

  • Drug eluting—Coated with a medicine that is slowly released. The medicine lowers the chances of another block in the same place.
  • Bare metal—Has no medicine.
Coronary Artery: Stent Procedure
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Possible Complications

Problems from the procedure are rare, but all procedures have some risk. Your doctor will review possible problems such as:

  • Bleeding where the catheter goes in
  • Damage to the artery wall
  • Heart attack or abnormal heart beats known as arrhythmias
  • Reaction to the x-ray dye
  • Blood clots
  • Infection
  • Stroke

Sometimes the stent isn’t enough or the artery narrows again. This may result in another procedure.

Your chances for problems are higher for:

  • Obesity
  • Smoking
  • Bleeding problems
  • Older age
  • Recent pneumonia
  • Recent heart attack
  • Diabetes
  • Kidney disease

SymptomsandDiagnosis

Treatments

This content is reviewed regularly and is updated when new and relevant evidence is made available. This information is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with questions regarding a medical condition.

Edits to original content made by Denver Health.

Call for Medical Help Right Away If Any of the Following Occur

Call for emergency medical services right away for:

  • Drooping facial muscles
  • Changes in vision or speech
  • Difficulty walking or using your arms
  • Change in sensation to affected leg or arm, including numbness, feeling cold, or change in color
  • Extreme sweating, nausea or vomiting
  • Lightheadedness
  • Chest pain
  • Rapid or irregular heartbeat
  • Coughing or breathing problems
  • Weakness or fainting

If you think you have an emergency, call for emergency medical services right away.

RESOURCES

American Heart Association http://www.heart.org 

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

Canadian Cardiovascular Society http://www.ccs.ca 

Heart and Stroke Foundation http://www.heartandstroke.ca 

References

Revascularization for coronary artery disease (CAD). EBSCO DynaMed Plus website. Available at:  http://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T901116/Revascularization-for-coronary-artery-disease-CAD . Updated June 2, 2018. Accessed July 3, 2018.

Stenting during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). EBSCO DynaMed Plus website. Available at:  http://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T114966/Stenting-during-percutaneous-coronary-intervention-PCI . Updated June 21, 2018. Accessed July 3, 2018.

Stents. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute website. Available at: https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/stents. Updated December 17, 2013. Accessed July 3, 2018.

11/7/2007 DynaMed Plus Systematic Literature Surveillance  http://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T901116/Revascularization-for-coronary-artery-disease-CAD : Bravata DM, Gienger AL, McDonald KM, et al. Systematic review: the comparative effectiveness of percutaneous coronary interventions and coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Ann Intern Med. 2007;147(10):703-716.